Sicario Review – A solid and intrepid action

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The modern revitalisation of the action genre has yielded several great results. In a world full of Precious Cargo, Polar, Mile 22 and Bright, it’s nice that we can occasionally break from the horrifically awful to have a moderately enjoyable experience. Sicario is an outlier in an otherwise bland genre, and it’s all thanks to direction and performance that make Sicario such a solid action movie.

Without a doubt the biggest selling point of this movie is the resounding cast, with Emily Blunt leading a very impressive ensemble which includes Josh Brolin, Benicio Del Toro and Daniel Kaluuya. Each give resounding performances, with Del Toro providing us with some of his best work in years. The normally excellent Blunt gives more of a so-so performance than anything else. Her strengths as a lead are unfortunately muddled with a depressingly dull subplot involving Jon Bernthal.

Del Toro on the other hand provides us with some of his greatest acting to date. His performance as the hitman Alejandro Gillick will always remain one of his best remembered modern roles. With some intense chemistry between him and Blunt, he sticks well as a supporting cast member. If anything, this makes me worry about how he’ll be fleshed out in Sicario 2: Day of the Soldado, his lack of mainstream presence as a character is what makes him so interesting, rather than a prominent appearance.

The twists and turns of the movie are worth sticking around for though, subverting expected clichés of the action genre. Villeneuve does well in this regard, often flashing quick glances of something larger than just an action movie throughout, culminating with an ecstatic final twenty minutes that pretty much salvage the movie in its entirety.

It’s about time I’d seen a good Villeneuve movie, after the resonantly bland Blade Runner 2049, it was only a matter of time before one of his works impressed me somewhat. Sicario isn’t the best movie ever made, but it’s certainly a solid output from an apparent modern icon. Banking almost solely on its strong performances and enjoyable direction, Sicario fails to make more of an impact or lasting impression than first expected. Muddled with the occasional pace-breaking scene or uneventful subplot, it’s definitely mixed, but good enough to warrant a recommendation.


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REVIEW OVERVIEW
Sicario
Ewan Gleadow
I've been writing for various different places for roughly four or five years now. Currently focusing my writing on film reviews, politics and occasional game reviews. Hopefully you enjoy my work, be sure to contact me if you have any criticisms or praise.

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